1940<span>s</span> 1940<span>s</span> 1940<span>s</span> 1940<span>s</span> 1940<span>s</span> 1940<span>s</span> 1940<span>s</span> 1940<span>s</span> 1940<span>s</span> 1940<span>s</span>

Viewing Options (requires cookies)

Show captions on mouse rollover only

Enable timeline navigation via keyboard

Previous/Next
Slide

Previous/Next
Decade

Launch slideshowTo see more images from the 1940s, as well as these images uncropped:

1940–49

War and Peace

World War II brings momentous change to Reed. Enrollment declines as both students and faculty members leave for war service. The college’s small number of Japanese American students are forced to leave Reed, many interned with their families under Executive Order 9066.

1940s slideshow thumbnail

TO SEE AN EXPANDED SLIDESHOW OF 1940s IMAGES:
LAUNCH SLIDESHOW

Reed secures a place in the U.S. Army Air Corps Pre-Meteorology program (AMP), bringing 268 men to campus for a year of scientific training, a move that helps provide financial support for the college during the war years.

Under the direction of history professor Reginald F. Arragon, the mandatory parallel courses in freshman history and literature fuse in 1943 into a general humanities course covering the ancient, medieval, and early modern societies of the West. When the sophomore history and literature courses—on the development of western civilization after the middle of the eighteenth century—give way to a unified modern humanities course designed by history professor Richard Jones and English professor Donald MacRae in 1946, the teaching faculty of the humanities program is shifted from history and literature to a broader range of disciplines.

A proposal to add Pacific studies to the curriculum is tabled, pending funding, but not before opposition is heard from professors F. L. Griffin and A.A. Knowlton. Knowlton reminds his colleagues that Reed should prudently cling to its first president’s injunction to do a few things well rather than jeopardize quality by expansion.

Following the war, veterans enrolling on the G.I. Bill bring both an increase in the student body and a more national composition of students. Literature and art professor Lloyd Reynolds introduces a calligraphy course in 1949 that quickly comes to shape the aesthetic of the campus, making Reed the center of a West Coast calligraphy revival. A college ski cabin is built on the slopes of Mount Hood, and a new chemistry building (later assigned to psychology) designed by Pietro Belluschi introduces a radically modernist look to the Reed campus.

The rich mix of veterans and international students at Reed after the war gives rise to a nascent bohemian culture that produces some of Reed’s most notable literary alumni, including poets Gary Snyder, Lew Welch, William Dickey, and Philip Whalen.

1940s : A SLIDESHOW

close    

1940s