1980<span>s</span> 1980<span>s</span> 1980<span>s</span> 1980<span>s</span> 1980<span>s</span> 1980<span>s</span> 1980<span>s</span> 1980<span>s</span> 1980<span>s</span> 1980<span>s</span>

Viewing Options (requires cookies)

Show captions on mouse rollover only

Enable timeline navigation via keyboard

Previous/Next
Slide

Previous/Next
Decade

1980–89

Protests, Personal Computers, and a Paradox

Reed College gains a lecture hall, classrooms, and much-needed faculty offices with the construction of Vollum College Center at the top of Eliot Circle. Students yearning for a less expensive cup of coffee on campus open their own café in the student union, eventually settling on the name “Paradox.” The space provides a new venue for recreation as well as caffeine, hosting in its first year the inaugural spring formal, regular comedy and music nights, a benefit for a friend in trouble with the law, and a showing of the complete Prisoner series. KRRC broadcasts a full roster of student-hosted shows, featuring a wide range of music.

1980s slideshow thumbnail

TO SEE AN EXPANDED SLIDESHOW OF 1980s IMAGES:
LAUNCH SLIDESHOW

Reed students, demanding that the college cease investing in companies that trade or have operations in South Africa, sign petitions, pass resolutions in successive student governments, and make presentations to the trustees. In 1985, students occupy President Bragdon’s office for two days in protest; in 1986, a hundred students take over Eliot Hall, effectively shutting down all administrative functions for nearly four days to protest the trustees' refusal to divest. In 1987, students take over the development office.

On the occasion of Reed’s 75th anniversary, the college mounts its first comprehensive fundraising campaign, raising $65 million in gifts and pledges, about $20 million in excess of the campaign goal of $45 million.

New visiting professorships and faculty chairs are established, Spanish gains departmental status, and pioneering programs in computing and educational technology begin. Sculpture classes are offered, and calligraphy is discontinued.

In 1988, Ed and Sue Cooley, along with John and Betty Gray, make a gift to the college to establish the Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery. Exhibitions for the gallery, which is located inside the library, are coordinated in collaboration with Reed faculty members and with attention to the interests and needs of the larger Portland community.

A significant addition is made to the library, making room for more shelf space and study areas and providing a formal home to the college’s archives. Once spread throughout various academic buildings, Reed’s math and science libraries are consolidated within the addition. The entrance on the west side of the building is closed, and the new main entrance to the library is located at the north end of the addition, pulling the center of the campus north and eastward.

Reed’s dean of students is replaced in 1981 with a formal student services office, headed by a new vice president. Students are critical of the change, and work with administrators and faculty members throughout the decade to craft an office that by 1990 offers the support they need for class loads, tutoring, leaves and absences, grades, and academic and personal difficulties.

Discover More

Share this page
Print this page

1980s : A SLIDESHOW

close    

1980s